LRES Environmental Analytical Laboratory Graduate Research Assistantships

The Environmental Analytical Lab (EAL) has funds to support two Graduate Research Assistants during the academic year. Information about the EAL can be found at www.montana.edu/eal-lres.

General Requirements: This award is made to graduate students within LRES who are engaged in analytical work involving instrumentation available in the EAL. Preference is givent to Ph.D. students advised by the EAL advisory board and director.

Stipend: $12,500

Specific Requirements:

  • Completion of a research credit with current analyst
  • ~10 hours per week commitment, mutually beneficial to EAL and student goals
  • Interest in and developing skill on at least one EAL instrument
  • Willing to run diverse samples for multiple users in order to master an instrument
  • Contribute to lab function

Interested students should provide a CV and breif letter summarizing any relevant lab experience, value of analytical experience to the student's research and professional goals, and what the student would hope to contribute as part of the EAL. 

Please send letters to the EAL Director by August 1st

 

Current Awardees 

FY20

Libby Mohr

Elizabeth Mohr

Advisor: Geoff Poole

Libby’s research interests are at the intersection of freshwater ecosystem biogeochemistry and simulation science. Her focus is on advancing scientific understanding of freshwater biogeochemistry via complementary in silico and laboratory experiments.  Currently, Libby is developing mechanistic models describing how variation in physical, chemical, and biological processes interact to influence biotic transformations of nutrients in streams. She is challenging these computer models with data from mesocosm experiments that include the addition of stable isotope tracers. Libby earned her B.S. in Environmental Earth Science and Chemical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis in 2015. She is beginning her third year of Ph.D. work in Dr. Geoff Poole’s Fluvial Landscape Lab. 

Meryl Storb

Meryl Storb

Advisor: Rob Payn 

Meryl’s research interests revolve around how human alteration of the landscape influences watershed systems. She is exploring the idea of human influence on lotic ecosystems through building mechanistic understanding related to how ecosystems respond to both changes in hydrology and also alterations to water chemistry (e.g. anthropogenic sources of nitrate).  Meryl’s dissertation research is focused on alpine stream ecosystems in the northern Rocky Mountains. Her fieldwork is focused on the West Fork of the Gallatin River in the rapidly developing Big Sky watershed in western Montana. Meryl earned her B.S. in environmental geology from the University of Montana in 2008. Afterwards she worked for 7 years as a hydrogeologist in the environmental consulting industry before she decided to return to school to pursue a doctorate. Meryl is also currently a Pathways student with the U.S. Geological Survey Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center, where she works in a part time capacity as a hydrologist while she is completing her degree at M.S.U.

Past Awardees 

FY19

Justin Gay

Advisor: Jack Brookshire 

R. Sasha Lowen

Advisor: Bruce Maxwell

FY18

Ethan Wologo

Advisor: Stephanie Ewing

Justin Gay

Advisor: Jack Brookshire 

Bryce Currey

Advisor: Jack Brookshire

FY17

Ethan Wologo

Advisor: Stephanie Ewing

Bryce Currey

Advisor: Jack Brookshire

FY16

Erika Sturn

Advisor: Stephanie Ewing

Aaron Scott Klingborg

Advisor: Jack Brookshire

 

FY15

Aaron Scott Klingborg

Advisor: Jack Brookshire

 

Meryl Storb

Advisor: Robert Payn

 

FY14

Aaron Scott Klingborg

Advisor: Jack Brookshire

 

Hailey Buberl

Advisor: Stephanie Ewing

 

FY13

Christine Miller 

Advisor: Stephanie Ewing

 

Jordan Holsinger

Advisor: Jack Brookshire

 

FY12

Krista Ehlert

Advisor: Rick Engel

 

Kelly Mildenberger

Advisor: Jack Brookshire

 

Evelyn Konigsberg

Advisor: Jeff Littlefield

Christine Miller

Advisor: Stephanie Ewing